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604-590-2121
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Exclusive Offer

In acknowledgement of a healthy work-life balance, and with the availability of numerous reliable emergency veterinary clinics in our surrounding area, we will now be CLOSED ON STATUTORY HOLIDAYS effective immediately. We will also be CLOSED SUNDAYS for the immediate future with a plan to reevaluate Sunday hours the end of May. We thank all of our clients for their understanding with the changes and disruptions over this past year as we have worked through renovations and on policies to enhance you and your pets's experience with us here at Scottsdale Veterinary Hospital.

For emergency concerns after hours, please call:

ANIMAL EMERGENCY CLINIC OF THE FRASER VALLEY, 6325 204 ST, LANGLEY - 604-514-1711
MAINLAND ANIMAL EMERGENCY CLINIC, 15338 FRASER HWY, SURREY - 604-588-4000
VANCOUVER ANIMAL EMERGENCY AND REFERRAL CENTRE, 6303 ALBERTA ST, VANCOUVER - 604-879-3737

For medication refills or special orders please call (604-590-2121) or email (reception@scottsdalevethospital.com) at least a few days prior to completing your current prescription or a week prior for any special order products. We are in the process of exploring options for an online webstore to be linked to our website that will help make refills and ordering much easier in the future.

From the Scottsdale Veterinary Team, we thank you.

New Patients Welcome

Call us at 604-590-2121.

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is a relatively common problem in both aging people (women) and dogs (we almost never see a hypothyroid cat!).  It is a condition where the thyroid gland/activity can no longer maintain normal levels of circulating thyroid hormones. These hormones are important in setting the metabolic rate or function of all cells within the body.

Cause: In most cases hypothyroidism is a result of a gradual atrophy or shrinking of the gland. In some cases, the thyroid gland cells are attacked by the immune system, an autoimmune process resulting in a condition called lymphocytic thryoiditis.

Susceptibility: This condition is most commonly diagnosed in dogs between the ages of 4 to 10 years of age. Breeds that have an increased risk for hypothyroidism include: Afghan, Airedale, Boxer, Shar pei, Chow, Cocker Spaniel, Dachshund, Doberman, Bull dog, Golden Retriever, Great Dane, Irish Setter and Miniature Schnauzer.

Clinical Signs: Like most diseases not all animals exhibit the same signs. Many of the common signs involve changes in hair coat. Dogs may show a poorer (dry or greasy) hair coat, slower hair re-growth and in severely affected animals, areas of symmetrical hair loss with or without skin darkening (pigmentation).

Many hypothyroid dogs gain weight easily and sometimes have decreased energy levels. Other signs may include slower heart rates, lethargy, intolerance to cold, infertility, constipation and rarely seizures.

Diagnosis: Hypothyroidism is easily diagnosed through a blood test looking specifically at hormone levels called T4 and TSH.

Treatment: This condition is easily and inexpensively treated with lifelong thyroid hormone supplementation. In most cases we prescribe the human medication Synthroid, to your local drugstore. We do not want to over supplement with this medication so we must check your dogs T4 level (generally once yearly) while on the drug. Giving too much thyroid hormone creates a condition known as hyperthyroidism which can be deadly if left unchecked.

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